Higher Ed: Medical Cannabis Courses Are Now Available at US Universities

Posted in Articles, BioEducation, Uncategorized

Back in the day when I was going to graduate school in Madison, WI,  there was no such thing as medical Cannabis (although there was plenty of weed to go around).  But, as the line in that old Dylan song goes “the times they are a changin”

Late last month, the University of California-Davis announced that it would be joining Humboldt State University in offering undergraduate students a course entitled Physiology of Cannabis.  FYI, Humboldt State has been offering courses in medical Cannabis since 2012 (not surprising since the school is located in prime Cannabis cultivation territory).

According to UC-Davis officials the semester-long, three credit course will be aimed at biology students and will cover the endocannabinoid system, the effects of cannabinoids on the human body and the therapeutic value of Cannabis.

Likewise, Sonoma State University announced that it will be offering a one day symposium on March 11, 2017  to members of the healthcare industry in the Bay area. The symposium is entitled Medical Cannabis: A Clinical and it is intended as a workforce development course.  Nurses, physicians and pharmacists can get continuing education credit for the course. Topics that will be covered include the history of cannabis, an introduction to cannabinoids and terpenes, dosing and administration of cannabinoids, legal implication and other medical-related issues. The university is also planning a three day course on Cannabis regulatory issues later in the month.

While these courses are available, there is currently no undergraduate degree program in Cannabis science/medicine offered by any US university or college. That said, don’t be surprised if this major becomes a reality in States where medical and recreational Cannabis are legal.

Until next time…

Good Luck, Good Job Hunting and Happy Trails

Career Advice: Why Social Media Can Make A Difference!

Posted in Articles, Career Advice, Social Media

Back in the old days, I scolded job candidates for having an active social media presence especially those persons who posted party pics or politically-charged comments on their Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc feeds.  However, the advent of fine-tuned privacy settings,Snapchat (where things go away without leaving much of a digital trace) and a broader understanding of the importance of social media for those entering job market or looking to transition to the next opportunity has changed the role that social media can affect a career.

While I can drone on about it here on my blog, I highly recommend an article that appeared this Sunday’s NY Times business section. The points that the author maker are valid and I recommend that new job candidates and experienced job seekers take a look at it.

Until next time…

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting!!!!!!

Trump and Manufacturing Jobs

Posted in Articles, BioBusiness, BioJobBuzz, Career Advice

The big news today is that Donald Trump and Mike Pence negotiated a deal with United  Technologies (owner of the big air-conditioner company Carrier) to keep 1000 of the 2,000 Indiana-based jobs that were slated to be moved to Mexico.  Of course, the terms of the deal were not announced (and possibly will never be). That said, it is likely Trump promised Carrier management tax breaks and incentives and other perks to keep 50% of the announced jobs in the US (why not all of them?).

While Trump supporters may see this as fulfillment of a campaign promise made by the Donald, it is nothing more than a PR stunt to suggest that Trump is able to keep jobs in the US and not move jobs to lower cost manufacturing markets like Mexico, Vietnam, Malaysia, Bangladesh, Indonesia and others. Notice that I did not mention China in the list of lower cost manufacturing destinations. That’s because, over the past 10 years, labor and manufacturing costs have skyrocketed in China and manufacturing there no longer makes fiscal or economic sense. Anyway, the Carrier story will be used to show that Trump unlike President Obama is able to stem or reverse the loss of US manufacturing jobs to foreign countries.

The reason for the post is twofold.  First,  most of the manufacturing jobs in the US have already been lost and they will not be coming back home anytime soon.This is because moving these jobs to lower cost markets has increased corporate profits and elevate public company stock prices. Nevertheless, it is important to note that over 200,000 US pharmaceutical manufacturing, marketing and sales jobs have been lost since 2001 because of outsourcing to lower cost foreign markets. Despite bleeding job losses, neither the Bush nor Obama administrations directly intervened to keep these jobs in the US. Both Bush and Obama likely believed that the US government ought not meddle with or tell private companies how to run their businesses.

Second, despite all of the hoopla, Trump/Pence were only able to save 50% of the 2000 jobs slated to be moved to Mexico. And, putting things in perspective saving 1,0000 “blue collar” jobs is peanuts as compared with the lost of over 200,000 pharmaceutical and life sciences jobs.  While saving 1,000 Indiana jobs may seem like a “win” for Trump supporters, I think the whole deal was really designed to distract said supports from other campaign promises that Trump has failed to live up to. For example, his decision to not investigate and possibly jail Hillary Clinton, his appointment of Washington lobbyists and Wall Street insiders to cabinet posts and advisory positions (whatever happened to “cleaning out the swamp?) and considering Mitt Romney for Secretary of State.

Finally, in my opinion, Trump’s personal involvement in negotiations with private companies sets a dangerous precedent because the Executive branch ought not be able to directly manipulate or negotiate private business transactions. To that point, I believe that oversight of US corporate transactions and business deals are best left to regulatory agencies like the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department rather than President of the US.  That said, President-elect Trump ought to be focused on running the US government; not negotiating business deals with private US corporations.

Until next time,

Good luck and Good Job Hunting!!!!!!

 

Preparing for Job Interviews

Posted in Articles, Career Advice

Much as been written about how to prepare for a job interview. I know that many of you are busy and don’t like to read long articles. To that point, the old adage: “one picture is worth a 1000 words” is especially apt for this post.  The following infographic came to me from Atiq Rehman of Acuity Training in the UK.

Until Next Time,
Good Luck and Good Job Hunting!!!!!!!!!

Struggling with Situational/Hypothetical Interview Questions? Check this out.

Posted in Articles, BioBusiness, Career Advice, Uncategorized

I typically do not recommend “how to” articles to job candidates unless I come across something that is novel and may be helpful to job seekers.  I found a FREE e-book on LinkedIn that may be useful for jobseekers who are not comfortable or may have trouble answering with behavioral or hypothetical questions during an interview.  

For those of you who may not know what I am talking about, a behavioral, situational or hypothetical question that a hiring manager may ask during a telephone or face-to-face job interview is something like “Tell me how you overcame adversity in your life” or “If you disagree with your supervisor on a work-related issue, how would you approach your supervisor with your concerns.”

While the job marketing appears to be tighten in the favor of job candidate and salaries are on the rise, questions such as the ones mentioned above, have become commonplace during job interviews. The goal of these questions is to determine how a job candidate thinks on his/her feet and whether or not you have the requisite problem solving skills required for a job offer.

Until next time….

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting!!!!!!!

Jobs at FDA

Posted in Articles

During my recent trip to teach at Georgetown University, I suggested to the students who were taking my regulatory compliance course to consider pursuing jobs at FDA. The reason for this job choice is very simple: the FDA is a good place to "be from". Inotherwords, if you have FDA regulatory experience on your c.v., the liklihood of getting a sweet job in industry after the leaving the agency is very good. Anybody and everybody who runs a pharmaceutical or biotechnology company wants to hire at least one ex-FDA employee. This is because ex-FDA folks have magical powers that enables them to help a company get their drugs approved much more efficiently and cost effectively. But, alas, I digress……. The truth is that FDA is seriously understaffed and needs more reviewers to evaluate INDs, NDA and BLAs and it also needs more regulators to inspect manufacturing operations that range from biomanufacturing facilities to chicken farms. And, as fars as I can ascertain, a job at FDA permits you to learn a lot of regulatory stuff, allows you to work a 7:00 to 4:00 job and provides its employees with great medical benefits. But alas, I digress……… again. Now, back to the students in my class. After I put forth the brillant FDA job idea to my students, one person (there is always one who is thinking) asks me "So, how do you become an FDA inspector?". I paused for a minute and said…."You know what? I don’t know"! Nobody had ever asked me that before….they always nodded their heads in agreement after I made the suggestion (I always thought that they were agreeing that is was a good idea….go figure). Tune in next time for sequel to this post entitled "Jobs at FDA: The Sequel" if you are interested in finding out! ——–

The Value of Experienced Employees

Posted in Articles

I am teaching a course on protein biochemstry at one of the Department of Energy’s laboratories in the Bay Area this week. My class consists of employees who used to work on weapons programs who are facing unemployment because their projects have been cancelled. I have been asked to teach them about proteins to determine whether they have an interest in or aptitude for working in the laboratory’s biosensing/microfluidics program. I have been extremely impressed with their talents and willingness to try new things. These are talented people that still have a lot of service to give. I hope that they all can keep their jobs here….The U.S. would be well served if they can! ——–