The Trump Effect? Macy’s to Shed 10,000 Jobs and Close Stores

Posted in BioBusiness, BioJobBuzz

Over the past few weeks, President-elect Donald Trump has taken much credit for saving several hundred US manufacturing jobs in Indiana. Also, he has excoriated car marker executives ranging from General Motors to Ford to Toyota for planning to build manufacturing facilities in Mexico. While it is not clear how many jobs Trump actually saved or whether his twitter rants prevented car manufacturers from setting up production plants in Mexico, it is clear that he cannot or will not save large numbers of American jobs in the retail/service sectors. To that point, Macy’s, last week, announced that it was shedding 10,000 jobs and closing 100 stores to cut costs to improve its bottom line.

You may ask why saving a few hundred air conditioning jobs at taxpayer expense more important than saving 10,000 American retail jobs? As you may recall, in the summer of 2015 Macy’s CEO Terry Lundgren  said that he would stop selling Donald Trump’s clothing line in all of its stores.  Lundgren decided to take this action because then candidate Trump said many Mexican immigrants were rapists or murderers. Shortly after Lundgren announced his decision, Trump called on his supporters to boycott Macy stores.

While it is unlikely that the Trump boycott was responsible for Macy’s decline (all department stores are are getting hammered by online retailers), I do not expect Trump to help Macy’s (like he helped Carrier) save any of the 10,000 jobs that will be lost.  This is because Trump is a vindictive and hateful man who will not help anyone unless they shower him with adulation or do as they are told. Further, he likely considers Terry Lundgren a “loser’ because his business is failing. And, if Donald was in charge,  Macy’s would be a HUGE and GREAT success. Put simply, Macy’s got what it deserves for dropping Trump’s clothing line and not reinstating it after Trump was elected President. And, as for Lundgren, he said

“We made our decision about a year and a half ago, and stand by our decision,”

It’s going to be a rocky ride for the next 4 years.  So buckle in and hold on for your life!

Until next time…..

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting!!!!!!!!!!

Trump’s Corporate Tax Holiday Proposal Will Hurt Job Creation

Posted in BioBusiness, BioJobBuzz

The notion that corporate tax holidays– congressional orders that allow corporations like Apple, Microsoft, Pfizer and others to bring overseas profits back to the US without penalty–create jobs is misleading and, based on previous such tax holidays mostly untrue.

According to an article in today’s NY Times Business section (a reliable source of real news), corporate tax holidays typically result in mergers and acquisition that typically result in job cuts.

…the last time Congress initiated a tax holiday, in 2004. The top 15 repatriating companies brought home $150 billion but reduced their work force by 20,931 jobs, according to a 2011 study commissioned by the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations.

In the coming months, Trump and his minions will be pushing for a new corporate tax holiday so that new jobs can be created. While this is certains to send shivers down the spines of most Trump supports, any jobs that will be created or not lost will not be the ones that midwestern small town employees or coal mines will benefit from. For example, the  corporations with the largest amounts of overseas monies are Apple and Microsoft, two technology companies that are unlikely to create new jobs for coal miners, service employees or blue collar workers.

While many Trump supporters believe that Barack Obama and the Democrats were responsible for manufacturing job loss in the US, the real reasons for their loss was mechanization/robotization and globalization. The lost manufacturing jobs are never coming back–despite Trump’s assertions that they are—and the only way unemployed factory workers will find new work is through retraining or moving to urban centers where jobs for unskilled workers appear to be on the rise.  Corporate tax holidays, income tax cuts and reduction in social programs will not lead to new job creation but to job loss.

Don’t let Trump destroy the economic recovery that President Obama brought to this nation.

Until next time…

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting

Alternative Energy and Innovative Technologies: How Trump Might Be Able to Create New Jobs

Posted in BioBusiness, Career Advice, Uncategorized

Trumps ideas around job creation center around saving jobs before they leave or possibly bringing back old manufacturing/ mining jobs to the US. We just witnessed how effective Trump was convincing the Carrier Corporation to not outsource jobs to Mexico or close factories in Indiana and move them south of the border. Further, many of the jobs that Trump talked about during his scorch-the-earth campaign (both figuratively and possibly literally), are obsolete because much of what humans did in these jobs is now automated and their participation is no longer required.  Put simply, Trump needs to think outside of his box (which will be extremely difficult but necessary) for him to fulfill one of his major campaign promises of creating new jobs for workers in the financially-devastated American heartland.

To that point, Ross Sorkin suggested a possible strategy in an editorial in today’s NY Times business section. In the opinion piece, Sorkin suggests that Trump model his job creation strategy divined by Elon Musk, the founder of Tesla, the electric car company; SolarCity, the solar power provider; and SpaceX, the rocket company..  According to Sorkin, Musk has nearly 35,000 new jobs (most of which are manufacturing jobs) in the past decade. This is an outstanding accomplishment for a single individual entrepreneur. However, instead of naming Musk to advise him on job creation, Trump decided that he was going to rely on the advice of people like Jamie Dimon, of JP Morgan Chase, Robert Iger of Disney and Mary Barra of General Motors all of whom benefitted from President Obama’s government bailout and are not exactly paragons of innovation. LIke Trump, these business leaders represent the old guard that want things to remain the same to help them maintain their power bases, corporate stock prices and large oversized CEO compensation packages (Musk takes $1 dollar a year in salary and has paid as much as $600 million in taxes annually).

Not surprisingly, Musk is a Democrat and despite creating tens of thousand of new American jobs, he is under assault and being vilified by conservative groups. This is because Musk believes in climate change. According to Sorkin:

…Conservative groups and individuals have taken to the internet with a litany of real and fake stories attacking Mr. Musk for the government subsidies Tesla receives, and for his vocal warnings on climate change.

Even worse, Sorkin reported:

Robert E. Murray, chief executive of Murray Energy Corporation, the largest privately owned coal company, called Mr. Musk “a fraud” for accepting $2 billion in government subsidies for Tesla.

Yet despite this hateful and untrue assault by Trump supporters, Musk suggested to Sorkin that even though he did not support Trump, that he would be “happy to talk with him” about job creation and climate change.

If I were Mr. Musk, I would not hold my breath.

Until next time….

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting

 

The Truth About Trump and Manufacturing Jobs: Part 2

Posted in BioBusiness, Uncategorized

While Trump has been on a so-called victory tour to convince his supporters that he fulfilled (sort of) one campaign promise to keep jobs in America (middle America really), he set a couple of dangerous precedents.

First, every US CEO worth his/her salt will be calling Trump to negotiate or renegotiate deals for tax breaks, incentives and guarantees of government contracts to keep manufacturing jobs in America.  And ,while Trump/Pence saved some jobs for Carrier employees (around 1000) another 1100 are still moving to Mexico. Surprisingly, to keep less than 50% of Carrier’s low tech manufacturing jobs in Indiana, Pence, Indiana’s governor, had to guarantee Carrier an additional $7.0 million in tax breaks and incentives. Great deal for Carrier and those employees, but not such a great deal for other Indiana citizens who may have to pay more to pay for the tax shortfall.

Second, Trump has other things besides jobs to focus on; like foreign affairs, national security, legislation and other Presidential things that he so desperately wanted to do after becoming President.  Because of this, Trump does not have the time to intervene and negotiate with every US company that threatens to move jobs (manufacturing or otherwise) to lower cost labor markets. His intervention in the Carrier situation set a bad precedent and pretty much invited other companies to see what kind of deal that they can get to keep jobs in the US (kind of sounds like corporate blackmail to me).

Put simply, Trump engineered this deal and set out on his victory tour to placate his supporters in the heartland and also to draw attention away from his cabinet picks and campaign promises that he made and will never fulfill.

Trump needs to start thinking more presidentially and finally  understand that governments cannot be run like businesses.  There is more to running a government than making money.

Until next time,

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting

Ranbaxy to Shed as Many as 400 Middle and Senior Management Jobs

Posted in BioBusiness

The UK’s Economic Times reported  today that the troubled Indian generic drug manufacturer Ranbaxy may shed as many as 400 jobs from its various divisions. Most of the persons receiving pink slips will be senior and middle management who are likely losing their jobs because of ongoing serious drug manufacturing problems that have plagued the company for over three years.  The drug maker employs about 14, 600 people in 43 countries.

While the job cuts do not represent a significant percentage of Ranbaxy’s workforce, Daiichi Sankyo which owns the company, is likely eliminating members of the management team that have been responsible for the company’s ongoing manufacturing problems. According to the Economic Times article

“On Thursday, some senior executives from the finance department at Ranbaxy were asked to leave. On Friday, some senior executives from the Research & Development wing were given marching orders,” an employee familiar with the job cuts told ET. Another executive said some officials from the API(active pharma ingredient) division have also been handed pink slips.

This past May, Ranbaxy paid the US Department of Justice $500 million to settle criminal and civil charges to resolve the manufacturing problems that prompted the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ban the sale of dozens of drugs manufactured by the company.  More recently, FDA inspectors issued an unsatisfactory inspection report for one of the company’s manufacturing plants in India.

Ranbaxy is one of the world’s leading generic drug manufactures and the company’s ongoing manufacturing problems have certainly hurt Daiichi Sankyo’s image. Also, it has led some analyst to question whether or not Daiichi Sankyo ought to have purchased the troubled generic manufacturer for $4.6 billion in 2008.

Until next time…

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting!!!!!!

Regulatory Affairs Update; FDA 483 and Warning Letters Trends for 2012

Posted in BioEducation

Those of you who manufacture products approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are well aware of the importance of complying with Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) during FDA mandated inspections of your manufacturing facilities. Failure to comply with cGMP requirements during an inspections results in the issuance of 483s. And if you fail to adequately address the concerns of the agency outlined in 483s, it may ultimately result in issuance of warning letter to your company.

FDA is more vigilant and aggressive than ever before with its 483 and warning letter enforcement procedures. In the words of Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, FDA is quick, visible and vigilant.  With this in mind, it may be worthwhile to participate in a webinar offered by Expert Briefings.com entitled “Top Compliance Trends for 483 and Warning Letters for 2012—Based on Rare FDA Data.”

The webinar will be held on March 8, 2012 from 2:00-3:30 PM EST and Dennis Moore, Managing Partner, AUK Technical Services and a 28 year veteran FDA investigator will lead it. 

Topics to be covered include:

  • Top warning letter trends for 2012, such as more 806 enforcement
  • The Top 10 QS 483 Observations for 2010 and 2011
  • Most common quality system failures for drugs for 2010
  • Top drug and device citations in 483s for 2010
  • Top drug and device warning letter citations for 2010
  • Total 2010 BIMO inspections for CDER, CBER, CDRH, and CVM
  • Details on clinical investigator, sponsor/monitor and IRB audits for 2010
  • Most common sponsor deficiencies for 2010
  • The rising trend of ‘cease to market’ letters, one of which hit a NY pharma company in 2011
  • The total number of 483s issued in 2010 and 2011 – an all time high
  • Total CAPA 483 observations in 2010
  • How long to receive a warning letter, based upon which offices issues it
  • 483 inspection targets for drugs and devices for 2010, 2011, and 2012
  • Total warning letters issued by drug and device category in 2010
  • Which district offices write the most warning letters
  • How long to receive a warning letter, based upon issuing office
  • Warning letters issued by QS system for 2010
  • 483s broken down by QS subsystem for 2010
  • Warning letters by CFR section
  • Top device 483 observations for 2010
  • Details on process validation observations for 2010
  • Design control 483 observations by category for 2010
  • Click here to visit Expertbriefings.com.

Click here to visit Expertbriefings.com.

I hope to see (hear ?) you at the webinar!

 

Boehringer Ingelheim Announces Plans to Bolster Its Manufacturing Capability in China

Posted in BioBusiness

The German pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim (BI) today announced that it plans on investing 70 million Euros to expand its manufacturing facility in the Zhangijiang High-Tech Park in Shanghai China. The expansion will continue through 2013 and the number of employees will increase from 240 to 400 at the new facility

BI was one of the first pharmaceutical companies to enter China in 1994 and the planned expansion was proposed to solidify the company’s position in the emerging Chinese market. The expansion will be modular and based on lean manufacturing practices to provide world class manufacturing capability at the site.   The company already sells certain therapeutic products in China including respiratory, cardiovascular, and CNS. Expansion of the existing manufacturing facility is intended to allow BI to expand into other therapeutic areas that include diabetes, oncology and stroke prevention.

Late last week Merck announced plans to build a new R&D facility in Beijing. Other companies have also announced plans to increase their presence in the Chinese market. I think it may be the time for American student to begin to consider Mandarin as their foreign language in primary and second school education programs.

Until next time…

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting!!!!!

 

The Impact of Pharma Downsizing on Manufacturing Plant Closures

Posted in BioBusiness

The Pharmalot blog today reported that pharma and biotech downsizing, restructuring and outsourcing have resulted in 38 manufacturing facilities in 2011. While this may not sound like a lot given the ongoing tough economy, the post reports that 65 facilities were closed in 2010. According to some estimates, these closures have resulted in the loss of roughly 18,000 life sciences manufacturing jobs in the past two years. Sadly, pharmaceutical manufacturing, like almost all other manufacturing jobs in the US are being lost at an unprecedented rate. Further, many of these manufacturing jobs are being outsourced to multinational CMOs or to manufacturing facilities being built by pharma companies in emerging markets like Latin America, Eastern Europe and Asia.

Not surprisingly, most of the 2011 closures were in the Northeast (8) resulting in the loss of roughly 1,400 jobs. And, not surprisingly again, one of the hardest hit states was New Jersey; home to almost all of the major pharmaceutical companies in the world. The next region that was hit hard is the Mid-Atlantic (7) with notable closures in Maryland (Shire Pharmaceuticals) and North Carolina (DSM Pharmaceutical Products).

Interestingly, while plant closures are on the rise, there is new manufacturing facility construction that may help to offset the losses. However, unlike the past, many of the new facilities are being financed by academic institutions and not-for-profits rather than life sciences companies. According to the post, roughly 106 new North American (not only the US) are underway and represent an investment value of $4.3 billion. The new Shire facility being constructed in Lexington, MA and the International Vaccine Center (InterVac) in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan were cited as examples.

Despite the constructions of several new manufacturing facilities in North America, it is obvious that most major life sciences companies are looking South and East for future pharmaceutical and biomanufacturing capabilities. The bottom line is that labor and the cost of goods are cheaper in these markets and in contrast with the past, there are skilled workforces in place to manufacture life sciences products according to American, European and Japanese Current Good Manufacturing Practices. 

Until next time…

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting!!!!!!!!

 

A Commentary: Pharma's Ongoing PR Problem

Posted in BioBusiness

Not a day goes by without some report about pharma’s ongoing problems with illegal drug promotions, class action suits against blockbuster medications or civil or criminal settlements with state and federal governments. A quick perusal of articles posted to the Pharmalot Blog in November alone revealed no fewer than eight big pharma companies including Lilly, Merck, GlaxoSmithKline, Bayer, Pfizer, Novartis and Amgen that were involved in some sort of legal action regarding inappropriate marketing claims or failure to disclose potential side effects of blockbuster drugs. To make matters worse, a larger than usual number of pharma companies have experienced manufacturing problems that have resulted in drug recalls or shortages. This list includes companies such as Genzyme, Baxter, Johnson & Johnson, GlaxoSmithKline and most recently Boehringer Ingelheim. While chronic legal and manufacturing problems are extremely troubling (some assert it is just the cost of doing “business”), I believe that the amount of money spent lobbying Congress for legislation favorable to the industry is even more egregious.

According to a recent post on Knowledge Ecology International, the pharma industry has so far spent $115,571,832 on lobbying in 2011 (this number is sure to go higher by the end of this fiscal year). Interestingly, the biggest year for pharmaceutical industry lobbying was in 2009—a year after the Affordable Health Care Bill was passed—with totals in excess of $186,000,000. Just think about how many jobs could have been saved if companies reinvested the money into R&D rather than greasing the palms of lobbyists to induce Congress to pass laws to continue to get favorable tax rates, improve ROI and bolster the stock prices of those companies! To wit, Newt Gingrich, a Republican Presidential candidate and Former Speaker of the House has been accused of lobbying former congressional colleagues to vote for a Medicare drug subsidy while he was a paid consultant to AstraZeneca. Gingrich vehemently denies these allegations; probably because he realizes that most Americans don’t like big pharma and may vote against him if the claims are proven to be true and he wins the Republican presidential nomination.

Not withstanding the legal issues and unnecessary lobbying, what is really hurting the pharmaceutical industry is its lack of communication and transparency with patients and its unfailing practice of putting profits before healthcare. While every big pharma company I know always talks about fulfilling unmet medical needs, meeting those needs always comes at great costs (literally) to patients. Sadly, many patients can no longer afford the costs of potentially lifesaving medicines and treatments. Unless pharma begins to change the way it presents itself to the American public, it will continue to suffer the lost of confidence and trust of the American people. And, if the industry is unable to regain the public’s trust, its inability  will ultimately result in legislation that allows the US government to control drug prices: something that exists in most other countries in the world and big pharma has been desperately trying to prevent for the past 50 years!

Until next time…

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting!!!!!!

 

Astra Zeneca to Invest $200 Million in New Manufacturing Facility in China

Posted in BioBusiness

British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca today announced that it would invest $200 million into a new manufacturing facility located in China Medical City in Jiangsu province in Eastern China. This is the company’s largest global investment ever in a single manufacturing facility. The new plant which will be completed by 2013 will manufacture intravenous and oral solid drugs. 

AstraZeneca was one of the first Western pharmaceutical companies to establish a presence in China (1993) and has fast become one of the leading biopharmaceutical companies in the country doing about $1.0 billion in business annually. 

Many of Astra Zeneca’s competitors including Novartis, Roche, Merck & Co. and others have also recently made large investments into Chinese R&D and manufacturing facilities. If this doesn’t eliminate anyone’s doubt that pharma is shifting its focus from the West to emerging markets, I am not sure what will!!! While this shift may be bad news for American life scientist seeking employment, it is certainly welcome news for Chinese Nationals who received their life sciences training in the US and other Western nations.

Until next time…

Good Luck and Good Job Hunting (there are openings in China!!!!!!)